E-Learning Heroes Challenge #126 -Basic Principles of Multimedia Learning

E-Learning Heroes Challenge #126 -Basic Principles of Multimedia Learning

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Challenge of the Week: Basic Principles of Multimedia Learning ELH Challenge #126

This week, your challenge is to design an interaction to teach one of the principles of multimedia learning. I went a little above and beyond and focused on an overview of CTML Theory.

 

Challenge of the Week

The number of principles has increased a little over the years, but they’re still practical, common-sense guidelines for designing effective training. The big win for designers is having research-based evidence to guide and support the decisions you make in course development.

  1. Multimedia Principle: People learn better from words and pictures than from words alone.
  2. Split-Attention Principle: People learn better when words and pictures are physically and temporally integrated.
  3. Modality Principle: People learn better from graphics and narration than from graphics and printed text.
  4. Signaling Principle: People learn better when cues are added that highlight the key information and its organization.
  5. Redundancy Principle: People learn better when the same information is not presented in more than one format.
  6. Coherence Principle: People learn better when extraneous material is excluded rather than included.
  7. Spatial Contiguity Principle: People learn better when corresponding words and pictures are presented near rather than far from each other on the screen or page or in time.
  8. Temporal Contiguity Principle: People learn better when corresponding words and pictures are presented simultaneously rather than successively.
  9. Segmenting Principle: People learn better when a multimedia message is presented in learner-paced segments rather than as a continuous unit.
  10. Pre-training Principle: people learn better from a multimedia message when they know the names and characteristics of the main concepts.
  11. Personalization Principle: People learn better when the words of a multimedia presentation are in conversational style rather than formal style.
  12. Voice Principle: People learn better when the words are spoken in a standard-accented human voice rather than a machine voice or foreign-accented human voice.
  13. Image Principle: People learn better when on-screen agents display humanlike gestures and movements.
  14. Embodiment Principle: People do not necessarily learn better when the speaker’s image is on the screen.

2 Comments

  1. There is some question as to whether the “Modality Principle” even exists (and, hence, whether the “Reverse Modality Principle” exists). See Joachim Reinwein (2012) “Does the Modality Effect Exist? and if So, Which Modality Effect?” and Stefanie Lindow et al. (2011) “On the Robustness of the Modality Effect: Attempting to Replicate a Basic Finding.” Certainly, these two articles raise important questions about that principle.

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